Rusty Nails

Parental Advisory Cautioned.
Emile Sherman, oil on canvas, 220 x 230cm by Adam Chang.
This was one of the many entries in the 2012 Archibald Prize held in Sydney each year at the Sydney Art Gallery, all though unsuccessful, I found it to be more interesting than what I found with the winners. 
What we see here is two modern paintings of a man, unrecognisable by most at first glance, adored by many. This man lies in the film industry, an artist himself. The simple beauty of art painted by art is amazing. 
Upon looking at the painting, the colour blue is definitely overwhelming, but the feeling of sadness is not there as we were taught once upon a time that blue is the colour of sadness. The subtle all most smirk in the first portrait helps us to recognise that the colours used throughout are those of clear, open and refreshing meaning. It’s all most as if Emile Sherman is right here, before us, with nothing else around but our clear minds. The blue works with us in drawing us closer to the painting, helping us identify the meaning behind his two facial expressions; one smirk and one vacant. 
I can’t help to imagine that these two images are both showing a side of Emile. The first, he is relaxed-looking, a smirk, eyes closed, facing away - all directs to a calm-side when he isn’t working. This was also suggested by his eyes being closed as his form of art can really only be appreciated, worked on and done with our eyes open. Then, the next image, he has his eyes open, eyebrows slightly inwards and less-than-a-smirk on his face which would (given our previous image) immediately make this his serious, work side. There are no colouring differences that would suggest Emile changing in any other way other than his mind switching on and off. Therefore, as previously stated, the colouring is there to draw us in and focus on his facial expression and to draw our own conclusion as to why there are two very different facial expressions. 
In conclusion, I find this artwork to be one of internal joy, a calming feeling washing over us that cannot be faked and I would recommend anyone to see it at the art gallery for themselves and decide what they think. 

Emile Sherman, oil on canvas, 220 x 230cm by Adam Chang.

This was one of the many entries in the 2012 Archibald Prize held in Sydney each year at the Sydney Art Gallery, all though unsuccessful, I found it to be more interesting than what I found with the winners. 

What we see here is two modern paintings of a man, unrecognisable by most at first glance, adored by many. This man lies in the film industry, an artist himself. The simple beauty of art painted by art is amazing. 

Upon looking at the painting, the colour blue is definitely overwhelming, but the feeling of sadness is not there as we were taught once upon a time that blue is the colour of sadness. The subtle all most smirk in the first portrait helps us to recognise that the colours used throughout are those of clear, open and refreshing meaning. It’s all most as if Emile Sherman is right here, before us, with nothing else around but our clear minds. The blue works with us in drawing us closer to the painting, helping us identify the meaning behind his two facial expressions; one smirk and one vacant. 

I can’t help to imagine that these two images are both showing a side of Emile. The first, he is relaxed-looking, a smirk, eyes closed, facing away - all directs to a calm-side when he isn’t working. This was also suggested by his eyes being closed as his form of art can really only be appreciated, worked on and done with our eyes open. Then, the next image, he has his eyes open, eyebrows slightly inwards and less-than-a-smirk on his face which would (given our previous image) immediately make this his serious, work side. There are no colouring differences that would suggest Emile changing in any other way other than his mind switching on and off. Therefore, as previously stated, the colouring is there to draw us in and focus on his facial expression and to draw our own conclusion as to why there are two very different facial expressions. 


In conclusion, I find this artwork to be one of internal joy, a calming feeling washing over us that cannot be faked and I would recommend anyone to see it at the art gallery for themselves and decide what they think. 

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